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Statement by the Spokesperson of the Embassy of the People's Republic of China in Canada
2004/03/09

(March 9, 2004)

 

At the invitation of the Canada Tibet Committee (CTC), the Dalai Lama will visit Canada from April 18 to May 5, 2004. Over a period of time, the CTC has lured many Canadian MPs into signing a petition supporting the so-called "Tibet-China Negotiation Campaign"and it has gone so far as to invite the Canadian Prime Minister to serve as an "honest broker". We are firmly opposed to this.

 

The position of the Chinese Government on this issue has been consistent and clear-cut. The Dalai Lama is not simply a religious figure, but was once the biggest serf owner of old Tibet, and now a politician in exile engaged in activities aimed at splitting China and undermining national unity. The issue of Tibet is neither a religious issue now an issue of human rights, but it rather is a matter of principle. Tibet is an integral and inseparable part of China. Tibetan affairs are the internal affairs of China that brook no foreign interference. Actually, the communication channel between the central government and Dalai has been open all along and the door of negotiation is open, too. Hence, we do not need the mediation by any broker. If Dalai recognizes that Tibet is a part of China and refrains from splitting activities, we can discuss anything with him.

 

We are opposed to the political activities aimed at splitting China and undermining national unity carried out by the Dalai Lama in any country and in any capacity. And we are opposed to any meeting with Dalai or support of his splitting activities by government officials in any country and in any form and capacity. The Canadian Government has indicated on many occasions that it understands the sensitivity of the issue and does not recognize the Tibetan government-in-exile or support Tibetan independence. We hope that the Canadian Government will honor their commitments by refusing to allow Dalai to visit Canada, to arrange any contacts between him and Canadian government officials in any capacity and in any form, so as not to upset or damage the bilateral relations.

 

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