Home > Topics > President Hu Jintao Attends the Seoul Nuclear Security Summit and the Fourth BRICS Leaders Meeting and Pays a State Visit to Cambodia
Chinese, U.S. presidents meet on ties, major issues
2012/03/26

SEOUL, March 26 (Xinhua) -- Chinese President Hu Jintao and his U.S. counterpart Barack Obama met Monday to discuss bilateral ties and major world and regional issues of common concern.

The meeting, which came on the sidelines of the Seoul Nuclear Security Summit scheduled for Monday and Tuesday, was the two leaders' first this year.

Prior to the talks, Hu said in brief remarks that this was his 11th meeting with Obama over the past three years.

Hu thanked the considerate arrangements made by the U.S. side during Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping's visit to Washington a month ago.

For his part, Obama said he was looking forward to a "constructive, frank and productive" meeting with Hu, saying that he would discuss economic and commercial issues with the Chinese president and look to expand trade.

Obama also said that he believed the meeting would offer an opportunity for both sides to talk about a wide range of international issues, including the situations in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Iran, Sudan and the Middle East.

The China-U.S. bilateral relationship is one of the most important in today's world. In the past 40 years since their diplomatic normalization, bilateral ties have advanced and made historic achievements despite twists and turns, bringing huge benefits to both countries.

In January last year, Hu paid a visit to the United States, during which the two countries agreed to build a cooperative partnership based on mutual respect and mutual benefit.

Last year, two-way trade between the two countries stood at 440 billion U.S. dollars, and mutual visits exceeded 3 million.

In February, Xi visited the United States to implement the important consensuses reached by Hu and Obama.

China and the U.S. should view and handle bilateral ties from a strategic and long-term perspective, Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi said at a press conference earlier this month.

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